TRADITIONAL ARTISANS AND MODERN ARCHITECTS

http://www.craftrevival.org/voiceDetails.asp?Code=111 Architecture, vol.1, no.7, p.22-27.   TRADITIONAL ARTISANS AND MODERN ARCHITECTS   a polemical statement   KK Kak     In the contemporary creative vocabulary, “tradition” and “modern” are two common buzzwords. Philosophical and sociological literature discusses them at some length but the dictionary provides a useful everyday meaning. According to the dictionary, “tradition” means […]

SOME THOUGHTS ON THE FUTURE OF TRADITION

Presented at the Sanjam Randhawa Memorial Conference   on “Textile Traditions in India: Contemporary Perspectives”, sponsored by Lady Irwin College, New Delhi, Feb 7-8, 2003.   SOME THOUGHTS ON THE FUTURE OF TRADITION   Krishen Kak   “Tradition” can be interpreted variously, according to whether one’s perspective is, for example, literary, political, sociological, or historical.  Which interpretation should we consider?  […]

INTEGRATING CRAFTS AND EDUCATION

Presented at the International Seminar on “Crafts, Craftspersons & Sustainable Development”, sponsored by the Crafts Council of India, the Development Commissioner for Handicrafts, Government of India, and the Export Promotion Council for Handicrafts, New Delhi, November 16-18, 2002   INTEGRATING CRAFTS AND EDUCATION   By Krishen Kak     Some Background Propositions:   (i)  The […]

The Decline & Fall of the Indian Manufacturing Economy

Seminar, “Celebrating Craft”, March 2003:42-48 (published under their title “Cultural genocide?”) http://www.india-seminar.com/2003/523/523%20krishen%20kak.htm  in  http://www.india-seminar.com/2003/523.htm The Decline & Fall of the Indian Manufacturing Economy Krishen Kak   Two extended quotations provide a context for discussion. The first is from a traveller’s account of a “Voyage to the East Indies” and was published in the mid-17th century. […]

TRADITIONAL CRAFTS: THE PRESERVATION AND FUTURE OF A CULTURAL HERITAGE

New Delhi: The Ritinjali Journal, Vol.1, 1998:24-29 Written by Krishen Kak; original courtesy inclusion of co-author’s name omitted. Two predominant ways of looking at a “cultural heritage” are as: Values or other intangibles that have been transmitted down the generations Material artefacts that are commonly understood to be typical of a particular culture and that […]

TOWARDS AN OBJECTIVE FOR THE HANDICRAFTS SECTOR

Handicrafts 5 Year Plans This was privately circulated since government permission to publish had been refused.  It is referenced extensively in SRUTI, “India’s Artisans: a status report” (New Delhi: Society for Rural, Urban and Tribal Initiative, 1995).  It was researched and written by Krishen Kak; the co-author’s addition was as a collegial courtesy.